i❤Math - Teaching the Singapore math method

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In 2015, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) gave 15-year-old students in every country the same math and science test. Singapore's teens places first. The country is so good at teaching math that its methods are now being adopted everywhere from Canada and the US to Israel and the UK.
Jenny Anderson / Quartz

SUNDAYS (June 2018-May 2019)

Level 1 - 2:50-3:40pm

Level 2 - TBD - vote

Level 3 - 1:50-2:40pm

Level 4 - TBD- vote

Level 5 - 12:50-1:40pm

Level 6 - 11:30-12:20pm

Level 7 - 9:30-10:20am

Level 8 - 10:30-11:20am

Singapore math is ready for the Common Core Standards & new State Testing Standards.

Students are given great visual tools, such as number bonds and bar models that visually explain the relationships amongst numbers. Students are constantly challenged to really think as they do math, and because they can’t just race through the problems, they find it mentally stimulating

The latest results from the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS)-an international assessment of 60 participating countries- have been released to prove that once again Singapore's students dominate both math and science in every tested grade level. This raises a familiar question: What makes Singapore students so STEM-savvy and what can U.S.
SINGAPORE: Singapore students are the world's best in mathematics and science, according to an international benchmarking study released on Tuesday (Nov 29). Primary 4 and Secondary 2 students here topped both subjects in the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), which assessed pupils from 63 other education systems around the world.

Why Singapore math?

Learning the Singapore way

"I listened to what the kids say in class -- they were not talking about math, they were talking about their life, but their conversation itself is mathematical logic," he said.

"That makes me think that...we can use a more vivid approach to reach out to the kids, especially those less motivated ones...use jokes to get students to think."

bangkokpost.com/news/asean/1183152/learning-the-singapore-way"I listened to what the kids say in class -- they were not talking about math, they were talking about their life, but their conversation itself is mathematical logic," he said.

"That makes me think that...we can use a more vivid approach to reach out to the kids, especially those less motivated ones...use jokes to get students to think."